World Map

Age of Earth

Age of Earth

4.6 billions years

Water Area

Water Area

361.132 million sq km

Countries

Countries

195

Escape Velocity

Escape Velocity

6.95 miles/second

Radius

Radius of Earth

3,959 miles

Surface Area

Surface Area

510.072 million sq km

Total Coastline

Total Coastline

372,000 mi

Highest Point

Highest Point

Mt. Everest

Circumference

Earth Circumference

24,901 mi

Orbit Speed

Orbit Speed

66,700 mph

Land Area

Land Area

148.94 million sq km

Population

Earth Circumference

7.8 bn

Lowest Point

Lowest Point

Dead Sea

Diameter

Earth Diameter

7,918 mi

Sun Orbit

Sun Orbit

365 days

Background

Globally, the 20th century was marked by: (a) two devastating world wars; (b) the Great Depression of the 1930s; (c) the end of vast colonial empires; (d) rapid advances in science and technology, from the first airplane flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina (US) to the landing on the moon; (e) the Cold War between the Western alliance and the Warsaw Pact nations; (f) a sharp rise in living standards in North America, Europe, and Japan; (g) increased concerns about environmental degradation including deforestation, energy and water shortages, declining biological diversity, and air pollution; (h) the onset of the AIDS epidemic; and (i) the ultimate emergence of the US as the only world superpower.

The planet's population continues to explode: from 1 billion in 1820 to 2 billion in 1930, 3 billion in 1960, 4 billion in 1974, 5 billion in 1987, 6 billion in 1999, and 7 billion in 2012. For the 21st century, the continued exponential growth in science and technology raises both hopes (e.g., advances in medicine and agriculture) and fears (e.g., development of even more lethal weapons of war)

Countries

Geography:

The surface of the earth is approximately 70.9% water and 29.1% land. The former portion is divided into large water bodies termed oceans. The World Factbook recognizes and describes five oceans, which are in decreasing order of size: the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, Southern Ocean, and Arctic Ocean.

The land portion is generally divided into several, large, discrete landmasses termed continents. Depending on the convention used, the number of continents can vary from five to seven. The most common classification recognizes seven, which are (from largest to smallest): Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia. Asia and Europe are sometimes lumped together into a Eurasian continent resulting in six continents. Alternatively, North and South America are sometimes grouped as simply the Americas, resulting in a continent total of six (or five, if the Eurasia designation is used).

North America is commonly understood to include the island of Greenland, the isles of the Caribbean, and to extend south all the way to the Isthmus of Panama. The easternmost extent of Europe is generally defined as being the Ural Mountains and the Ural River; on the southeast the Caspian Sea; and on the south the Caucasus Mountains, the Black Sea, and the Mediterranean. Portions of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey fall within both Europe and Asia, but in every instance the larger section is in Asia. These countries are considered part of both continents. Armenia and Cyprus, which lie completely in Western Asia, are geopolitically European countries.

Asia usually incorporates all the islands of the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The islands of the Pacific are often lumped with Australia into a \"land mass\" termed Oceania or Australasia. Africa's northeast extremity is frequently delimited at the Isthmus of Suez, but for geopolitical purposes, the Egyptian Sinai Peninsula is often included as part of Africa.

Although the above groupings are the most common, different continental dispositions are recognized or taught in certain parts of the world, with some arrangements more heavily based on cultural spheres rather than physical geographic considerations.

Based on the seven-continent model, and grouping islands with adjacent continents, Africa has the most countries with 54. Europe contains 49 countries and Asia 48, but these two continents share five countries: Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey. North America consists of 23 sovereign states, Oceania has 14, and South America 12.

Largest Bodies of Water

Rank Body of Water Amount
1 Pacific Ocean 155.557 million sq km
2 Atlantic Ocean 76.762 million sq km
3 Indian Ocean 68.556 million sq km
4 Southern Ocean 20.327 million sq km
5 Arctic Ocean 14.056 million sq km
6 Coral Sea 4,184,100 sq km
7 South China Sea 3,595,900 sq km
8 Caribbean Sea 2.834 million sq km
9 Bering Sea 2.52 million sq km
10 Mediterranean Sea 2.469 million sq km

Largest Islands

Rank Island Surface Area
1 Greenland 2,166,086 sq km
2 New Guinea (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea) 785,753 sq km
3 Borneo (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia) 751,929 sq km
4 Madagascar 587,713 sq km
5 Baffin Island (Canada) 507,451 sq km
6 Sumatra (Indonesia) 472,784 sq km
7 Honshu (Japan) 227,963 sq km
8 Victoria Island (Canada) 217,291 sq km
9 Great Britain (United Kingdom) 209,331 sq km
10 Ellesmere Island (Canada) 196,236 sq km

Largest Landmasses

Rank Land Mass Surface Area
1 Asia 44,568,500 sq km
2 Africa 30.065 million sq km
3 North America 24.473 million sq km
4 South America 17.819 million sq km
5 Antarctica 14 million sq km
6 Europe 9.948 million sq km
7 Australia 7,741,220 sq km
8 Greenland 2,166,086 sq km
9 New Guinea 785,753 sq km
10 Borneo 751,929 sq km

Smallest Independent Countries

Rank Country Surface Area
1 Holy See (Vatican City) 0.44 sq km
2 Monaco 2 sq km
3 Nauru 21 sq km
4 Tuvalu 26 sq km
5 San Marino 61 sq km
6 Liechtenstein 160 sq km
7 Marshall Islands 181 sq km
8 Saint Kitts and Nevis 261 sq km
9 Maldives 298 sq km
10 Malta 316 sq km

Largest Lakes

Rank Lake Amount
1 Caspian Sea (Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia, Turkmenistan) 372,960 sq km
2 Lake Superior (Canada, United States) 82,414 sq km
3 Lake Victoria (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda) 69,490 sq km
4 Lake Huron (Canada, United States) 59,596 sq km
5 Lake Michigan (United States) 57,441 sq km
6 Lake Tanganyika (Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zambia) 32,890 sq km
7 Great Bear Lake (Canada) 31,800 sq km
8 Lake Baikal (Russia) 31,494 sq km
9 Lake Nyasa (Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania) 30,044 sq km
10 Great Slave Lake (Canada) 28,400 sq km

Longest Rivers

Rank River Amount
1 Nile (Africa) 6,693 km
2 Amazon (South America) 6,436 km
3 Mississippi-Missouri (North America) 6,238 km
4 Yenisey-Angara (Asia) 5,981 km
5 Ob-Irtysh (Asia) 5,569 km
6 Yangtze (Asia) 5,525 km
7 Yellow (Asia) 4,671 km
8 Amur (Asia) 4,352 km
9 Lena (Asia) 4,345 km
10 Congo (Africa) 4,344 km

* The areas of the lakes are subject to seasonal variation; only the Caspian Sea is saline, the rest are fresh water (2013)

World Economy

The international financial crisis of 2008-09 led to the first downturn in global output since 1946 and presented the world with a major new challenge: determining what mix of fiscal and monetary policies to follow to restore growth and jobs, while keeping inflation and debt under control. Financial stabilization and stimulus programs that started in 2009-11, combined with lower tax revenues in 2009-10, required most countries to run large budget deficits. Treasuries issued new public debt - totaling $9.1 trillion since 2008 - to pay for the additional expenditures. To keep interest rates low, most central banks monetized that debt, injecting large sums of money into their economies - between December 2008 and December 2013 the global money supply increased by more than 35%. Governments are now faced with the difficult task of spurring current growth and employment without saddling their economies with so much debt that they sacrifice long-term growth and financial stability. When economic activity picks up, central banks will confront the difficult task of containing inflation without raising interest rates so high they snuff out further growth.

Fiscal and monetary data for 2013 are currently available for 180 countries, which together account for 98.5% of world GDP. Of the 180 countries, 82 pursued unequivocally expansionary policies, boosting government spending while also expanding their money supply relatively rapidly - faster than the world average of 3.1%; 28 followed restrictive fiscal and monetary policies, reducing government spending and holding money growth to less than the 3.1% average; and the remaining 70 followed a mix of counterbalancing fiscal and monetary policies, either reducing government spending while accelerating money growth, or boosting spending while curtailing money growth.

(For more information, see attached spreadsheet, Fiscal and Monetary Data, 2008-2012.)

+ Read More

In 2013, for many countries the drive for fiscal austerity that began in 2011 abated. While 5 out of 6 countries slowed spending in 2012, only 1 in 2 countries slowed spending in 2013. About 1 in 3 countries actually lowered the level of their expenditures. The global growth rate for government expenditures increased from 1.6% in 2012 to 5.1% in 2013, after falling from a 10.1% growth rate in 2011. On the other hand, nearly 2 out of 3 central banks tightened monetary policy in 2013, decelerating the rate of growth of their money supply, compared with only 1 out of 3 in 2012. Roughly 1 of 4 central banks actually withdrew money from circulation, an increase from 1 out of 7 in 2012. Growth of the global money supply, as measured by the narrowly defined M1, slowed from 8.7% in 2009 and 10.4% in 2010 to 5.2% in 2011, 4.6% in 2012, and 3.1% in 2013. Several notable shifts occurred in 2013. By cutting government expenditures and expanding money supplies, the US and Canada moved against the trend in the rest of the world. France reversed course completely. Rather than reducing expenditures and money as it had in 2012, it expanded both. Germany reversed its fiscal policy, sharply expanding federal spending, while continuing to grow the money supply. South Korea shifted monetary policy into high gear, while maintaining a strongly expansionary fiscal policy. Japan, however, continued to pursue austere fiscal and monetary policies.

Austere economic policies have significantly affected economic performance. The global budget deficit narrowed to roughly $2.7 trillion in 2012 and $2.1 trillion in 2013, or 3.8% and 2.5% of World GDP, respectively. But growth of the world economy slipped from 5.1% in 2010 and 3.7% in 2011, to just 3.1% in 2012, and 2.9% in 2013.

Countries with expansionary fiscal and monetary policies achieved significantly higher rates of growth, higher growth of tax revenues, and greater success reducing the public debt burden than those countries that chose contractionary policies. In 2013, the 82 countries that followed a pro-growth approach achieved a median GDP growth rate of 4.7%, compared to 1.7% for the 28 countries with restrictive fiscal and monetary policies, a difference of 3 percentage points. Among the 82, China grew 7.7%, Philippines 6.8%, Malaysia 4.7%, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia 3.6%, Argentina 3.5%, South Korea 2.8%, and Russia 1.3%, while among the 28, Brazil grew 2.3%, Japan 2.0%, South Africa 2.0%, Netherlands -0.8%, Croatia -1.0%, Iran -1.5%, Portugal -1.8%, Greece -3.8%, and Cyprus -8.7%.

Faster GDP growth and lower unemployment rates translated into increased tax revenues and a less cumbersome debt burden. Revenues for the 82 expansionary countries grew at a median rate of 10.7%, whereas tax revenues fell at a median rate of 6.8% for the 28 countries that chose austere economic policies. Budget balances improved for about three-quarters of the 28, but, for most, debt grew faster than GDP, and the median level of their public debt as a share of GDP increased 9.1 percentage points, to 59.2%. On the other hand, budget balances deteriorated for most of the 82 pro-growth countries, but GDP growth outpaced increases in debt, and the median level of public debt as a share of GDP increased just 1.9%, to 39.8%.

The world recession has suppressed inflation rates - world inflation declined 1.0 percentage point in 2012 to about 4.1% and 0.2 percentage point to 3.9% in 2013. In 2013 the median inflation rate for the 82 pro-growth countries was 1.3 percentage points higher than that for the countries that followed more austere fiscal and monetary policies. Overall, the latter countries also improved their current account balances by shedding imports; as a result, current account balances deteriorated for most of the countries that pursued pro-growth policies. Slow growth of world income continued to hold import demand in check and crude oil prices fell. Consequently, the dollar value of world trade grew just 1.3% in 2013.

Beyond the current global slowdown, the world faces several long standing economic challenges. The addition of 80 million people each year to an already overcrowded globe is exacerbating the problems of pollution, waste-disposal, epidemics, water-shortages, famine, over-fishing of oceans, deforestation, desertification, and depletion of non-renewable resources. The nation-state, as a bedrock economic-political institution, is steadily losing control over international flows of people, goods, services, funds, and technology. The introduction of the euro as the common currency of much of Western Europe in January 1999, while paving the way for an integrated economic powerhouse, has created economic risks because the participating nations have varying income levels and growth rates, and hence, require a different mix of monetary and fiscal policies. Governments, especially in Western Europe, face the difficult political problem of channeling resources away from welfare programs in order to increase investment and strengthen incentives to seek employment. Because of their own internal problems and priorities, the industrialized countries are unable to devote sufficient resources to deal effectively with the poorer areas of the world, which, at least from an economic point of view, are becoming further marginalized. The terrorist attacks on the US on 11 September 2001 accentuated a growing risk to global prosperity - the diversion of resources away from capital investments to counter-terrorism programs.

Despite these vexing problems, the world economy also shows great promise. Technology has made possible further advances in a wide range of fields, from agriculture, to medicine, alternative energy, metallurgy, and transportation. Improved global communications have greatly reduced the costs of international trade, helping the world gain from the international division of labor, raise living standards, and reduce income disparities among nations. Much of the resilience of the world economy in the aftermath of the financial crisis resulted from government and central bank leaders around the globe working in concert to stem the financial onslaught, knowing well the lessons of past economic failures.

Sabalico Logo
Sabali Mail Logo
Sabali Analytics Logo
Senty Logo
World Map Logo
SEO Guide Logo
Keyword Tool Logo
Domain Search Logo
What is my IP Logo
My Device Logo
My Browser Logo
My Location Logo
Time Zone Logo
My Weather Logo
My Galaxy Logo
The Moon Logo
Flight Tracker Logo
Periodic Table Logo
Test Speed Logo
Website On Logo
Page Load Logo
Code Editor Logo
Format Code Logo
HTML Validator Logo
CSS Validator Logo
ASCII Table Logo
HTML Symbols Logo
Emoji Symbols Logo
File Save Logo
File Convert Logo
Encode File Logo
Sitemap Generator Logo
Generator Password Logo
QR Code Generator Logo
Barcode Generator Logo
Online Sign Logo
PDF Reader Logo
Thesaurus Online Logo
Dictionary Online Logo
Counter Word Logo
Text Convert Logo
Word Spinner Logo
Lorem Ipsum Generator Logo
Sprite Sheet Logo
Edit Picture Logo
Resize Image Logo
Image Compress Logo
Image Color Logo
Image Crop Logo
Combine Images Logo
Favicon Generator Logo
Color Palette Logo
Color Picker Logo
Color Mix Logo
Color Convert Logo
CSS Gradient Logo
rStatistics Logo
Free Data Logo
Random Data Logo
World Population Logo
Unit Convert Logo
Data Convert Logo
Coordinate Converter Logo
Temperature Convert Logo
Currency Convert Logo
Phone Country Logo
To-Do List Logo
Calendar Free Logo
Free Calculator Logo
Finance Calculator Logo
Loan Calculator Logo
Calculator Mortgage Logo
Stock Calculator Logo
Bond Calculator Logo
Tax Calculator Logo
Tip Calculator Logo
Gas Mileage Logo
Generator Meme Logo
Coronavirus Tracker Logo
2020 Election Logo